Archbishop of Perth continues with Ordinations in the face of large objection

“The Archbishop of Perth, Kay Goldsworthy, chose on Wednesday evening to continue with and preside over the ordination to the priesthood of a man living with his civil union partner despite receiving a formal objection from a large number of members of the diocese, both clergy and lay.

The letter of objection, forwarded to davidould.net, is signed by 25 clergy, 12 wardens, 18 parish councillors and 64 other church members. It asks the Archbishop to not proceed with ordaining the candidate …

The clergy objecting represent more than 15% of clergy in the diocese (based on 2022 General Synod delegate numbers). The laity represent a variety of the largest parishes and the overwhelming majority of financial contributions for the diocese from the parishes.”

David Ould draws attention to events in Perth.

Communique from the Australian Bishops after meeting Archbishop Justin Welby

The Primate of the Anglican Church of Australia, Archbishop Geoffrey Smith, has released this communiqué after the Australian bishops met with the Archbishop of Canterbury this week.

(This copy via the Diocese of Bathurst.)

The cracks widen in the Australian Anglican Church

“Archbishop Raffel’s ‘Do you see the crowds’ address at Oran Park was mission driven and gospel focused, particularly asking how to reach the new housing estates where 30 new churches are needed to reach the hundreds of thousands of people who are moving into the Greenfields areas to the west of Sydney.

There was no mention of Brisbane.

It was a stunning contrast to South East Queensland Archbishop’s Phillip Aspinall’s hand grenade presentation, attacking evangelicals and Sydney Anglicans, which has so far led to the resignations of two of his ministers and the splitting of two Brisbane congregations.

The second minister to resign in Brisbane is Peter Judge Mears. …”

At The Pastor’s Heart, Dominic Steele highlights Archbishop Kanishka Raffel’s Synod Presidential Address on Saturday. He also speaks with Peter Judge-Mears who has just announced his resignation from the Diocese of Brisbane.

Related:

Archbishop Aspinall’s 2022 Presidential Address here (PDF file).

Bishop Glenn Davies’ Address at the ACL Synod Dinner 2022

The Rt Rev Dr Glenn Davies spoke tonight, 12 September 2022, at a packed ACL Synod Dinner.

His topic?  “Where to from now? The place of Sydney Anglicans in Australia”.

Dr Davies, former Archbishop of Sydney, is Deputy Chair of Gafcon Australia and also Bishop of the newly formed Diocese of the Southern Cross.

Speaking of the Anglican Church of Australia, he said there is a fracture in unity, holiness, catholicity and apostolicity – a tear in the fabric.

Take the time to hear his very informative address:

 

or download the 11.5MB / 23 minute mp3 file. (right click on the link to Save As.)

News from Brisbane: Peter Judge-Mears to resign and join the Diocese of the Southern Cross

Peter Judge-Mears, the Rector of St. John’s Wishart in the Diocese of Brisbane, has posted this announcement on the church’s Facebook page

“Dear brothers and sisters at St Johns,

It is with deep sadness that I announce my resignation as Rector of St Johns, Wishart. I have found it a great privilege to serve in this church over just under 14 years as Associate Minister, Priest in Charge and Rector. Sybil and I, along with our children, have been partners with you in proclaiming the gospel to the local community. As a family, we have been blessed by your generosity and friendships. Sybil and I have been privileged to walk alongside you through times of deep sorrow and times of great joy.

Sadly, over these 14 years, I have witnessed the increasing divergence between received Anglican theology and the theology of the diocese. This culminated in the Archbishop’s Synod address and the changes to Faithfulness in Service.

Although I have appreciated the time and graciousness that the Archbishop has extended to discuss my concerns, my concerns have not been allayed. Neither has the recent resignation of the Archbishop, who merely gave a clear voice to the theology now taught in our theological college and from the pulpits of our churches.

Most of you have known the struggle I have had since synod and are aware that this decision has been one I have wrestled long over. I am concerned that the mission of Jesus with which we are charged should be delayed no longer. I am grateful to the Archbishop’s Commissary (Bishop Cameron) who has allowed me to move far faster than the required 3 months. Accordingly, my final Sunday will be Sunday 18th of September, after which I intend to take a short break before commencing services on October 2nd under the Diocese of the Southern Cross.

Your servant in Christ Jesus,
Peter.”

Please do pray for Peter and his family and for the church at Wishart.

Image from Peter’s announcement to the congregation on Sunday 11 September 2022. (video)

From the church website:

“Peter has been the minister of St John’s since 2010. He graduated from Moore College in 1997 and was ordained in New Zealand in 1999.”

Related:

In July 2022 Peter published an open letter to Archbishop Phillip Aspinall in response to his Address to the Brisbane Synod. Read the full letter here (PDF file).

And read Archbishop Aspinall’s Presidential Address here (PDF file).

Diocese of the Southern Cross.

An Anglican “lifeboat” for Australia

“We have recently seen the announcement of the activation of a new ‘extra-provincial’ Anglican diocese in Australia.

The ‘Diocese of the Southern Cross’ (‘DSC’) is not a part of the official ‘Anglican Church of Australia’ (‘ACA’). It has been set up to provide an ecclesiastical home for congregations who are Anglican by theology and conviction but find themselves unable to accept the authority of bishops of the ACA who do not accept the teachings of the Bible, especially on the subject of the Biblical views of marriage. …”

– At Law and Religion Australia, Neil Foster gives some legal background to the new Diocese of the Southern Cross.

The Doctrine of Marriage in the Anglican Church of Australia – Has it Changed?

“As the dust begins to settle over last week’s announced formation of the Diocese of the Southern Cross attention has naturally turned by some to the question of whether such an action was actually necessary. Has the doctrine of marriage actually changed in the Anglican Church of Australia? If it hasn’t, then why such an allegedly unnecessary and radical course of action?

The Primate of Australia, Archbishop Geoff Smith of Adelaide, issued a statement [pdf] on Thursday 18 August, the day on which Bishop Glenn Davies was formally commissioned as the first bishop of the new diocese.

Smith’s core complaint is clearly expressed:

The meeting of the General Synod held in May this year clearly affirmed the view that marriage is between a man and a woman, and declined to affirm same sex marriage. It is perplexing therefore that the leaders of this breakaway movement cite the reason for this new denomination as the failure of General Synod to explicitly express an opinion against the blessing of same sex marriages. …

The Primate claims that the doctrine of marriage has not changed and yet the revisionists now act as though it has.”

– David Ould takes a look at what has actually changed in the Anglican Church of Australia.

False teaching revisionists caused the Australian Church schism – with Foley Beach, Glenn Davies, Richard Condie and Jennifer Hercott

On a special edition of The Pastor’s Heart, Dominic Steele speaks with

Richard Condie, Bishop of Tasmania and Chair of Gafcon Australia

Glenn Davies, Bishop of the new Anglican Southern Cross Diocese and Former Archbishop of Sydney

Foley Beach, Primate of the Anglican Church in North America, and Chair of the Gafcon Primate’s Council

Jennifer Hercott, Member of Gafcon Australia Board and registrar of the Diocese of Central Queensland.

Watch or listen here. 30 minutes. (Main programme starts at 55 seconds.)


Related:

An open letter to the Archbishop of Brisbane – 11 July 2022.

Archbishop of Brisbane’s Presidential Address  – 25 June 2022 (PDF file).

Dr Robert Tong on the Appellate Tribunal Opinion – 12 November 2020.

Many posts relating to General Synod 2022.

The Line in the Sand: The Appellate Tribunal Opinion and the Future of the Anglican Church in Australia – Joint publication of The Australian Church record and The Anglican Church League.

The Line in the Sand Author Interview: Glenn Davies.

Anglican Unscripted 755 – A New Diocese

In the very latest Anglican Unscripted video, David Ould speaks with GAFCON Australia Chairman Bishop Richard Condie and Dr Glenn Davies, today (Thursday 18 August) to be commissioned as the first Bishop of the new Diocese of the Southern Cross.

Bishop Davies:

“So this diocese is like a lifeboat – a safe refuge a safe haven – for people who want to remain Anglican but not under the current Anglican structure in the Anglican Church of Australia.

I love the Anglican Church of Australia. I’ve been a member of that all my life. But to see it in this disarray is very sad.

So, it’s not a triumphalist feeling I have with regard to this. Rather, it is a sense of sadness – but joy for those who want to remain Anglican – that I may, with the gifts that God’s given me, maintain that relationship for these congregations.”

He also asks us to pray that the evil one will be restrained.

“But let our focus be on spreading the good news of the gospel to all Australia. That’s what we’re all about. We want to be faithful disciples of Jesus and proclaim Christ faithfully to our nation.”

Watch it all. 9 minutes.

A new Anglican diocese, bishop and church in Australia

“The first congregation of the new Diocese of the Southern Cross started at Beenleigh in Brisbane last Sunday and the Diocese’s first bishop Glenn Davies will be appointed on Thursday.  …”

– The very latest news – from The Pastor’s Heart.

Related:

An open letter to the Archbishop of Brisbane – 11 July 2022.

Dr Robert Tong on the Appellate Tribunal Opinion – 12 November 2020.

Many posts relating to General Synod 2022.

The Line in the Sand: The Appellate Tribunal Opinion and the Future of the Anglican Church in Australia – Joint publication of The Australian Church record and The Anglican Church League.

The Line in the Sand Author Interview: Glenn Davies.

Australia loses Indigenous Christian pioneer

Archbishop of Brisbane Sir John Grindrod and Bishop Arthur Malcolm at St. Andrew’s Cathedral Sydney, February 1988. Photo by Ramon Williams Worldwide Photos.

“Archbishop Kanishka Raffel has paid tribute to Australia’s first Indigenous Bishop, Arthur Malcolm, who has passed away at the age of 87. …

His influence and ministry led to the public apology from the Anglican Church to Aboriginal people in 1988.

At St Andrew’s Cathedral in Sydney, Australian Anglican Bishops led by the Primate, Sir John Grindrod, delivered an apology to Bishop Malcolm, saying

“My brother in Christ: … May I express on behalf of all non-Aboriginal people of our church profound sorrow for the suffering that your people have had to endure, with its violence and hurt. We humbly ask God’s forgiveness; and we seek your forgiveness as a leader of your people, for the actions of the past and those causing hurt at the present time. We have longed to share with your people the gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ. We confess our endeavour has often fallen short of his love.”

In turn, Bishop Malcolm said

“My brother in Christ: For a long time we have been hurting… but it is through the message of Jesus Christ that we have learned to forgive.  We have received this forgiveness, and now in turn we must also forgive.”

– At SydneyAnglicans.net, Russell Powell has this story about Bishop Arthur Malcolm.

Top photo: Archbishop of Brisbane Sir John Grindrod and Bishop Arthur Malcolm at St. Andrew’s Cathedral Sydney, February 1988.

Below: The Australian Bishops gathered at St. Andrew’s Cathedral in Sydney in February 1988.

Both photos by, and with thanks to, Ramon Williams, Worldwide Photos.

The Australian Bishops gathered at St. Andrew's Cathedral in Sydney for the Apology in February 1988. Photo: Ramon Williams, Worldwide Photos.

Vale Bishop Arthur Malcolm

Archbishop Sir John Grindrod and Bishop Arthur Malcolm at St. Andrew’s Cathedral Sydney by Ramon Williams, Worldwide Photos.

News via The Anglican Board of Mission’s Facebook page –

“ABM is sad to report the passing of Bishop Arthur Malcolm. Bishop Arthur was Australia’s first Aboriginal Bishop and an outstanding leader and pastor in the Australian church. Bishop Arthur retired from his episcopal role in 2001 but has continued to inspire and encourage from his home in Yarrabah, North Queensland. ABM expresses our sincere condolences to Aunty Coleen and the entire family.

Bishop Malcolm was born at Yarrabah (Queensland) and began training as a Church Army Officer in Stockton (New South Wales) where he completed a Certificate course in Evangelism in 1959. During his time as a Captain in the Church Army he served at Lake Tyers (Victoria) and Brewarrina (New South Wales). People from Victoria and New South Wales express great affection for their beloved “Captain”.

He returned to Yarrabah in 1974 as Chaplain and was ordained by the Bishop of North Queensland in 1978. As well as ministering to his people at Yarrabah he had responsibility for Anglican people at Palm Island. He was made a Canon of St James’ Cathedral, Townsville in 1984 and consecrated Bishop with special responsibility to Aboriginal people in 1985.

During this time he developed an outstanding leadership amongst Aboriginal people and encouraged them in their education, community life and in the many struggles which Indigenous people in Australia encounter.

He has also been engaged in leadership and pastoral support in the non-Indigenous community and is well respected and admired for his sensitive and reconciling counsel. …”

Read the full post here.

Photo: Archbishop of Brisbane Sir John Grindrod and Bishop Arthur Malcolm at St. Andrew’s Cathedral Sydney, February 1988. – Photo by, and with thanks to, Ramon Williams, Worldwide Photos.

An open letter to the Archbishop of Brisbane

In response to Archbishop Phillip Aspinall’s Address to the Brisbane Synod on 25th June 2022, The Rev. Peter Judge-Mears, the Rector of a parish in the diocese, has written an open letter –

“Dear Archbishop Phillip,

I wrestled hard with how I should respond to your Presidential Address last month. I remain grateful for your gracious invitation to address my concerns with you in person. However, I feel that the very public nature of your comments and the impact they have had on our Diocese demand an equally public response. …”

Read the full letter here (PDF file).

It would be good to pray for all involved.

And read Archbishop Aspinall’s Presidential Address here (PDF file).

Photo: Archbishop of Brisbane Phillip Aspinall.

Bishop of Gippsland: “There is no obstacle” to Same-sex Blessings. Is Brisbane next?

“In his recent Presidential Address to the Diocesan Synod, Bishop Richard Treloar has told his diocese that there is no longer any bar on the blessing of same-sex marriages. …

Having summarised the position, Bishop Treloar then makes his announcement, presenting this as a fait accompli that he has no power as bishop to resist …

Gippsland is the first of what may be many dioceses taking similar steps; simply acting as though the matter is now decided rather than passing the relevant motions at their synod. Next up is the Diocese of Brisbane which begins tonight.”

– David Ould shares the latest from Gippsland and speculates on what might be announced at the Synod of the Diocese of Brisbane.

I contend that twelve bishops did defy the will of the General Synod over human sexuality

“In a recent opinion piece, Matthew Anstey provided an account of the recent debate in the General Synod of the Anglican Church of Australia over the meaning of marriage.

While this piece largely elaborated the Archbishop of Brisbane’s recent letter to his clergy, it contained such egregious errors of fact and attribution of motive that it calls for a response. …”

– Principal of Moore Theological College (and former ACL President) Dr Mark Thompson writes for ABC Religion and Ethics.

He concludes,

“This General Synod was remarkable for one other thing. It brought to light the remarkable work God is doing among Anglicans across the country. Anglicans with a vision for reaching the nation with the message of salvation, hope and life in Jesus Christ — Anglicans from every diocese in the national church — are joining together. Joyful in the grace they have received and wish to share with others, confident in the teaching of Christ given to us in the Bible, prayerfully dependent upon our heavenly Father, led by the Spirit as they live as disciples of Christ, they see the future as full of opportunity.

The shape of Anglicanism across the country is changing, and I believe that is a very good thing.”

Take the time to read to better understand what happened at General Synod.

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