Jay Behan consecrated in Christchurch

Jay Behan has been consecrated as the first Bishop of the Diocese of the Church of Confessing Anglicans Aotearoa/New Zealand this morning in Christchurch.

Bishops from across the Tasman and around the world took part in the service.

ACNA Archbishop Foley Beach and Chairman of the GAFCON Primates Council presided, and former Archbishop of Sydney Peter Jensen preached.

The event was live-streamed, and a recording may be seen via the ConfessingAnglicansNZ Facebook page (a Facebook account is not needed). Audio starts about 12 minutes into the recording, just as the service proper begins.

Archbishop Peter Jensen delivers the sermon. Bishops Peter Lin and Bill Atwood look on.

Archbishop Foley Beach addresses Jay Behan.

Listening to the consecration charge.

Dr Laurent Mbanda, Primate of Uganda and Vice-Chairman of the GAFCON Primates Council, reads one of the Consecration questions while Archbishop Foley Beach (left) and Bishop Julian Dobbs (right) look on.

The laying on of hands.

“There’s much for us to do. This world is full of darkness and we know the One who is the Light of the World. … We’ve got to preach and proclaim the Lord Jesus Christ.” – Jay Behan speaking after his consecration.

(Images from the live-stream video.)

Jay Behan’s consecration to be live-streamed

GAFCON advises that Jay Behan’s consecration service will be live-streamed from Christchurch on the Gafcon Facebook page @gafconference. Here’s when to watch it live in your timezone:

Australian Eastern Daylight Time:
7:30am Saturday 19 October.
UK BST: 9:30pm 18 Friday October.
USA ET: 4:30pm Friday 18 October.
USA PT: 1:30pm Friday 18 October.

A Facebook account is not needed to see the live-stream on the Facebook page.

(Photo from Sydney Synod: Anglican Media Sydney.)

The heart of a bishop, as a new Anglican Diocese is born – with New Zealand’s Jay Behan

At this week’s The Pastor’s Heart podcast, Dominic Steele speaks with Jay Behan, to be consecrated on Saturday as the first bishop of the Diocese of the Church of Confessing Anglicans Aotearoa/New Zealand.

Watch above, or at The Pastor’s Heart.

ACL Synod Dinner Address 2019

Jay Behan Bishop-elect of the Diocese of the Church of Confessing Anglicans Aotearoa/New Zealand, spoke to a packed gathering at the Anglican Church League’s Synod Dinner in Sydney on Monday 14th October.

Jay will be consecrated on Saturday in Christchurch.

Synod members will look forward to next year’s ACL Synod Dinner.

A friendly welcome!

Jay Behan addresses a capacity crowd.

Jay Behan to be first bishop of the new diocese of Confessing Anglicans in NZ

A significant development in New Zealand.

From the Synod of the Church of Confessing Anglicans Aotearoa/New Zealand:

“Today representatives from twelve churches throughout New Zealand gathered and formed the Church of Confessing Anglicans Aotearoa/New Zealand.

By the grace of God we are a new Anglican Diocese in these Islands, standing firmly in Anglican faith and practice, and structurally distinct from the Anglican Church of Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia.

This new Diocese is united in the crucified, risen, ascended and glorified Christ, committed to the authority of the Bible, and dedicated to our common mission of proclaiming to all the good news of Jesus in the power of the Holy Spirit. We praise God for his guidance and grace, and the sense of unity and common purpose we shared as we met.

We also prayerfully elected as our first Bishop the Rev. Jay Behan, Vicar of St Stephen’s Anglican Church, Christchurch.

Jay is a man of humility and grace, committed to the authority of the Bible and the Lordship of Jesus. He is an excellent preacher and caring pastor, and will serve and lead the Diocese as together we seek to reach these Islands with the transforming power of the gospel. …”

– Read the full statement via the GAFCON website. (Emphasis added.)

Gracefully leaving an apostate denomination

From Dominic Steele at The Pastor’s Heart:

“Minister of St Stephen’s Christchurch Jay Behan tells the heartbreaking story of leading his church away from the traditional Anglican Church in New Zealand and working to form a new Diocese for faithful Anglicans.

Jay Behan tells of his tearful resignation from the New Zealand Anglican Church’s General Synod, just hours after the Synod voted to abandon the teaching of Jesus on sexuality. …”

Watch here.

From Susie Leafe, Director of Operations, Gafcon UK:

Today and tomorrow (Friday & Saturday) the inaugural synod of a new Anglican extra-provincial diocese will be meeting in New Zealand. Last month, the Gafcon Primates affirmed the decision to form this new diocese and it would be great to pray for them as they face this ‘day of small things.’

And from the Gafcon Secretariat (via e-mail), some history:

In 2016, the Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia (ACANZP) accepted a report which stated that the Church wanted to find a way to remain united despite having two integrities on matters of sexuality. After much debate, the Church changed their canons last year to allow the formal blessing of same-sex relationships.

For some, the decision in 2016 caused them to leave the ACANZP, others followed when the canons were changed.  Relationships between these folk and between them and the ACANZP have, for the most part been gracious and cordial.

The churches forming the extra-provincial diocese include those who left in 2016 and those who left later. As they made their decisions about the future, their desire to serve each other and those who will come after them, was evident.

Fellowship of Confessing Anglicans New Zealand calls for Nominations for their first Bishop

“The Fellowship of Confessing Anglicans Aotearoa/New Zealand is a new Diocese in New Zealand.

Because of the rejection of the authority of Scripture by the Anglican Church of Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia at the 2018 General Synod, a number of parishes and individuals have chosen to disaffiliate from ACANZP and gather together in 12 parishes to form a new expression of Anglicanism.

As a Christ-centred church in the historic Anglican faith and order, we are calling for nominations for our first Bishop. We are seeking a person who has a desire to serve as our Bishop…”

– News from The Fellowship of Confessing Anglicans Aotearoa/New Zealand.

Archbishop of Sydney: Further statement on Christchurch attack

Here’s a further statement from Archbishop Glenn Davies:

Anglican Church Diocese of Sydney

Public Statement

The horror of the massacre of Muslims, praying in a Christchurch Mosque, has resonated with people of all faiths and of none around the world. That anyone, let alone an Australian, could execute such an atrocity and film it for his heinous gratification, is still hard to believe as the extent of this crime became fully known.

I have conveyed to the leaders of Sydney’s Muslim community our absolute horror and revulsion at these attacks and our determination to stand with them in condemning all acts of violence, especially racially and religiously motivated acts of inhumanity as we have seen. I have also conveyed our condolences to the New Zealand High Commissioner, Dame Annette King, indicating our solidarity with New Zealand.

In St Andrew’s Cathedral today special prayers will be offered for survivors and families of the victims, while a minute’s silence will be observed to commemorate the dead. The NZ Consul General in Sydney, Mr William Dobbie, will be in attendance for this service.

Our hearts cry out to the God of all comfort, the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, in whom alone will justice and mercy be found, especially when events such as these overwhelm us.

Archbishop Glenn Davies

17 March, 2019 AD.

– via SydneyAnglicans.net.

‘Anglican splinter group grows as first same-sex blessing goes ahead in Canterbury’

“Another Anglican vicar has resigned over the decision to allow same-sex blessings as the first ceremony takes place in Canterbury under the new rule.

Rangiora vicar Andrew Allen-Johns resigned from his parish earlier this month and established a new church in central Christchurch called Anchor. The move comes as a male couple became the first in Canterbury to have a same-sex blessing under the Anglican church.…”

– Story from Stuff.co.nz.

Some thoughts on the New Zealand response to the proposal from Sydney

“On 13 November Archbishop Donald Tamihere and Archbishop Philip Richardson replied to Archbishop Davies on behalf of the General Synod Standing Committee of ACANZP.

In their reply they note that Anglicanism in New Zealand has been shaped by a specific two hundred year history and that:

‘To be Anglican in this land requires that we, led by our Lord Jesus Christ, face into this shared history so that we can help shape a common future for all people based on peace and justice and righteousness.’ …

As they see it, it would be impossible to recognise as Anglican a body that was not bound by the ‘laws and promises and solemn commitments’ of the current ACANZP.

On this basis they say they are unable to accept Archbishop Davies’ proposal. To an outside observer, however, it is not clear why this should be the case. …”

Anglican theologian Martin Davie devises a simple test to help understand why Archbishop Davies’ proposal (PDF) was not acceptable.

Archbishop Glenn Davies’ Response to New Zealand

Here is the text of Archbishop Glenn Davies’ letter to Archbishop Donald Tamihere and Archbishop Philip Richardson, of the Anglican Church of Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia, in response to their letter about his proposal

Correspondence to Primates 13/11/18

Dear Archbishop Donald and Archbishop Philip

Greetings in the name of our risen Saviour.

Thank you for your gracious letter and for providing me with a copy before it is publicly released.

I greatly enjoyed my time with you and other leaders in Hamilton last August. Your hospitality and welcome introduced me to aspects of M?ori culture which I found profoundly moving.

At the meeting, I learned more of the troubled history of colonialism, which clearly still reverberates within the country and the Church. If any part of my proposal was seen as reinforcing any colonial intervention, I am deeply sorry, as this was not my intention.

Growing up as an Anglican in Australia, I have treasured the Bible, the Thirty-nine Articles and the Book of Common Prayer, which to me express the essence of being Anglican, though I also recognise the cultural differences that Anglicanism may reflect in different countries.

Although I am sorry to hear of the outcome of your deliberations concerning my proposal, I fear that two Anglican Churches will still arise in Aotearoa, but without mutual recognition. While sad, this is now inevitable. Our General Synod Standing Committee passed a resolution at our meeting on Friday last, which will no doubt be communicated to you separately by the General Secretary. In the resolution, apart from noting the recent decisions of ACANZP have impaired our relationships, as they are in contradiction to Resolution I.10 of Lambeth 1998, it also noted that they were not in accordance with the teaching of Christ in Matthew 19:1-12. We also indicated our support for all Anglicans in Aotearoa, not only those who remain in ACANZP but also those who choose to leave.

We live in a broken world, and sometimes brothers and sisters disagree on the way forward. I am very grateful for the consideration of my proposal which I believe you took seriously and conscientiously. While my purpose in the proposal was specific to the context of your Church, it is true that there are ramifications for the wider Anglican Communion. I thought that ACANZP might be able to give a lead in this regard but it may well be that my lack of understanding of your culture has impeded my ability to find an agreeable way forward. Again, if this has caused offence, I offer my sincere apologies.

I trust that relationships between the Anglican Church of Australia and the ACANZP, while impaired by the decision of your Synod, may still find opportunity for fellowship in the name of our risen Saviour in the days ahead.

Maranatha!

Grace and peace

Glenn.

Source: SydneyAnglicans.net.

St. Matthew’s Dunedin ‘to disaffiliate’ from Church — report

“St Matthew’s in Stafford St [Dunedin] this week voted to disaffiliate from the church.

The decision means those in the parish who supported the move — it is understood 79% voted for disaffiliation — will have to find a new place to worship. Bishop of Dunedin the Rt Rev Steven Benford confirmed the move yesterday. …”

– Report from The Otago Daily Times. Photo courtesy St. Matthew’s Dunedin.

Thanks, but no thanks: New Zealand Church leaders reject Sydney proposal

“A proposal by the Archbishop of Sydney for an overlapping Anglican diocese or province to cater for Anglicans in New Zealand opposed to the blessing of same-sex marriage has been rejected by the leaders of the Anglican Church of Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia (ANZP).

In May, the ANZP General Synod passed a ‘compromise’ resolution on the blessing of same-sex civil marriages in a move that was designed to allow both theological conservatives and those campaigning for change to stay in the same church. But a number of Anglicans have responded to the vote by saying that they were seeking to leave the Church as a result of the decision. …”

– Report from The Anglican Communion News Service.

In their reply to Archbishop Glenn Davies (PDF file – via Anglican Taonga), Archbishop Donald Tamihere and Archbishop Philip Richardson, speak of the cultural and colonial background of the Anglican Church of Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia:

“One of the key messages we hoped you would take to your home from our meeting at Hemi Tapu is the unique consequences of our history as Anglicans in Aotearoa New Zealand.

We are a Church made up of colonised and coloniser.

We have a difficult history. It is a shared history. We know the language, the face and the consequences of colonisation. For Ma?ori, disenfranchisement, alienation from whenua [Land], racism and poverty are consequences of this shared history. …

To be Anglican in this land requires that we, led by our Lord Jesus Christ, face into this shared history so that we can help shape a common future for all people based on peace and justice and righteousness. …

If those disaffiliating want to be committed to that fundamental consequence of being Anglican in Aotearoa New Zealand, then they must stay in these constitutional and Treaty-based relationships.

We cannot recognise a Church as Anglican which does not encapsulate this 200 years of relationship and history. ”

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