‘NSW abortion bill has left us feeling betrayed’

“There are signs that maybe, just maybe, Premier Gladys Berejiklian is starting to listen and understand how much damage NSW’s extreme abortion bill has inflicted on her government.

Last week offered a ray of hope, as she softened her stance on amendments to fix some of the bill’s most brutal flaws, such as sex-selection abortions that would target girls, just for being girls. Her party is bitterly divided. …

And then, just three days ago, the Stand For Life rally in Martin Place and outside Parliament House in opposition to the bill drew a mammoth attendance of an estimated 10,000 people. … Perhaps the most breathtaking moment of the emotional evening was the live audio of a 23-week-old unborn baby’s heartbeat, amplified onstage by ultrasound.”

– Writing in The Catholic Weekly, Campion College student Bethany Marsh writes about the Stand For Life rally and what is really at stake.

After the Stand for Life rally, students from Campion College sang this haunting carol for for passers by. The carol is based on Matthew 2 and the Massacre of the Innocents.

Here’s another video of the singing at Freedom for Faith’s Facebook page.

Are the Nationals the ‘New Greens’?

“Are the Nationals the ‘New Greens’? Has the National Party been commandeered by the Progressive Left? What does the National Party stand for any more?

G.K. Chesterton said: ‘When men choose not to believe in God, they do not thereafter believe in nothing, they then become capable of believing in anything.’ Equally, it could be said that when a political party loses its reason for existence and its moral fabric it will inevitably allow anything. …”

– The Bishop of Armidale, Rick Lewers, doesn’t beat about the bush in his latest “In Focus” article.

Albert Mohler on the Abortion votes in NSW and New Zealand

On his daily programme, “The Briefing” for 19th August 2019, Albert Mohler looks at the moves in Australia and New Zealand to ‘decriminalise’ abortion and ‘modernise’ the law.

He looks closely at the language used, and the logic behind the statements.

Betrayal of the Gospel of Life

“There are so many things that can be said about the passage of the abortion-till-birth bill through the Lower House last week.

We could talk about the ramming through of a Labor-Greens policy under the banner of a Berejiklian-Greenwich government.

We could talk about the ‘lipstick on a pig’ amendments that did nothing to make this evil bill any better.

Or we could talk about the chilling, cackling laughter from MPs that was heard throughout the Parliamentary chamber after the bill passed.

For anyone who heard it, the sound could only be described as demonic.

But I won’t explore those in any detail this week. Instead, I want to talk about two other aspects of last week’s debate that really struck me. …

It wasn’t only the MPs that were betraying the Gospel of Life (and the Gospel more generally) last week. Disgracefully, certain Christian leaders did too…”

– Monica Doumit, Director of Public Affairs and Engagement for the Catholic Archdiocese of Sydney, writes this opinion-piece for The Catholic Weekly.

Cathedral gimmicks illustrate spiritually blind Britain and mute Church

“No doubt buoyed by the old cliche that there is no such thing as bad publicity, the Church of England continues to include in its own Daily Media Digest several reports and opinion pieces in a number of media outlets about the installation of a golf course and helter skelter in Rochester and Norwich cathedrals.

While some have defended the gimmicks as harmless ways of raising money and attracting to an experience of the sacred those who would never normally darken the doors, there have been criticisms (for example here and here) from those pointing out that this trivialises the Christian faith and is a sign of lack of confidence in the gospel…”

– Andrew Symes writes at Anglican Mainstream.

Further towards a culture of death?

“Another tragic milestone in our country’s history was put in place on Thursday night as the New South Wales Legislative Assembly, by a vote of 59 to 31, passed legislation to decriminalise the late-term abortion of unborn children. The tragedy lies not just in the vote, but in the arguments put forward in support of the Bill and the reaction of politicians and other advocates once it had been passed.

Of course, this was simply one more step along a road that Australia and the Western world have been travelling for some time. …

While there is still an opportunity we should petition those in the New South Wales Legislative Council not to give their concurrence to this Bill. Yet even more, we need to speak of life and hope in this context of death and fear and extraordinary self-righteousness in which we find ourselves.”

– At Theological Theology, Moore College Principal Dr Mark Thompson writes plainly about the Reproductive Health Care Reform Act 2019.

Pass the link around, and be encouraged to make a submission before 5:00pm Tuesday 13th August 2019.

Berejiklian government risks alienating the west with abortion bill

“The Liberal Party should tread extremely carefully in dealing with the attempt to decriminalise abortion in NSW, lest it put off the conservative-leaning voters (particularly in western Sydney) that helped it retain both state and federal government earlier this year. …”

An opinion-piece in The Sydney Morning Herald, by Nepean Young Liberal Branch President. (via SydneyAnglicans.net.)

Bishop Rick Lewers on the proposed Abortion Bill

“It is a little staggering that after weeks of writing articles on family I have to write in the hope of saving our children from the poor decisions of our politicians.

There is before our State Government the ‘Reproductive Health Care Reform Bill 2019.’  It is a Private Members Bill, but don’t let the title of the Bill deceive you. It would seem that those moving the Bill and those supporting it are too embarrassed to call it what it actually is.

This Bill, if it is passed by the NSW State Government, will significantly change the law on abortion. …”

– Bishop of Armidale, Rick Lewers, has written this column for his local newspaper. It’s also published on the diocesan website. Do read it all.

The Tragedy of Joshua Harris: Sobering thoughts for Evangelicals

“Several people have obviously wondered, ‘How did this come out of the blue?’ But it didn’t really come out of the blue. There had been troubling signs for some time …”

– in his latest issue of The Briefing, Albert Mohler addresses the tragedy of Joshua Harris’ ‘falling away’ from the Christian gospel.

Hey Ministers and Theologians: When it comes to the secular workplace, you just don’t get it

“The Israel Folau storm has exposed many things, and this is one of them: many ministry workers have little idea of the pressures people face in the modern workplace. They just don’t get it. Not that it stops them making big statements about it.

If you’re a Christian ministry worker and you’ve had a lot to say about Izzy (either for or against) the last few weeks on social media, then it might be time to get off Facebook and have a listen to the people in your congregation who hold down a job Monday to Friday. …”

Steve McAlpine’s latest article is published at the Gospel Coalition Australia.

Have all our changes been good ones?

“Perhaps it is an opportune time to ask ourselves about some of the changes that have occurred in church ministry in the last little while. It would be good to begin a conversation about whether those changes are all as good as we might have thought them to be.”

– Moore College Principal Dr Mark Thompson asks some questions about change, in order to provoke discussion.

See them, and consider your response, at Theological Theology.

How might Folau’s court case impact religious freedom?

“A victory in his case would be helpful as sending a message that believers have the freedom to speak in accordance with their faith, even when saying something that offends. And perhaps in persuading employers that they should not try to rely on over-broad “codes of conduct”. …

If he loses his case, it will in my view send a message to corporate Australia that they can require uniformity of opinion on controversial topics. It may lead to further restrictions on what Christians can say in public.”

The Gospel Coalition Australia speaks with Associate Professor Neil Foster about the decision by Israel Folau to begin legal proceedings against Rugby Australia.

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